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Original Article
Alterations in amplitude of low frequency fluctuation and regional homogeneity in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder and cognitive impairment: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study
YANG Yang  RUI Qianyun  CHEN Xiang  HAN Shuting  WU Xiaojuan  XUE Qun  LI Yonggang 

Cite this article as: Yang Y, Rui QY, Chen X, et al. Alterations in amplitude of low frequency fluctuation and regional homogeneity in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder and cognitive impairment: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study[J]. Chin J Magn Reson Imaging, 2022, 13(4): 62-68. DOI:10.12015/issn.1674-8034.2022.04.011.


[Abstract] Objective To investigate the alterations in amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) in cognitively impaired patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD).Materials and Methods Thirty-four patients with NMOSD and 39 healthy controls were included and underwent neuropsychological evaluations and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Patients were classified as cognitively impaired (n=16) and cognitively preserved (n=18). ALFF and ReHo analyses were used to explore the differences in brain spontaneous activity among the cognitively impaired, cognitively preserved and healthy control groups. Data were processed and analysed using the DPABI toolbox based on MATLAB. Two-sample t-tests were used for comparisons of ALFF and ReHo between each two groups. ALFF and ReHo values in brain regions that showed statistical significance were extracted for correlation analysis with clinical and neuropsychological data in the whole NMOSD group.Results The cognitively impaired group showed significantly higher ALFF in the left caudate nucleus and left parahippocampal gyrus compared to the cognitively preserved group, significantly higher ALFF in the left caudate nucleus compared to the healthy control group, and significantly lower ReHo in the left middle cingulate cortex compared to the healthy control group (P<0.001 at voxel level and P<0.05 at cluster level, GRF corrected). ALFF and ReHo values in brain regions with statistical significance showed significant correlations with multiple cognitive test scores in NMOSD patients. Also, ALFF values in the left caudate nucleus and parahippocampal gyrus were positively correlated with the number of relapses in patients (P<0.05).Conclusions Abnormal baseline brain activity in the left parahippocampal gyrus, caudate nucleus and middle cingulate cortex may be implicated in the neural mechanisms of cognitive decline in patients with NMOSD.
[Keywords] neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder;cognitive impairment;resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging;amplitude of low frequency fluctuation;regional homogeneity

YANG Yang1   RUI Qianyun2   CHEN Xiang1   HAN Shuting1   WU Xiaojuan1   XUE Qun2*   LI Yonggang1*  

1 Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China

2 Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China

Li YG, E-mail: liyonggang224@163.com Xue Q, E-mail: qxue_sz@163.com

Conflicts of interest   None.

Received  2021-10-27
Accepted  2022-03-16
DOI: 10.12015/issn.1674-8034.2022.04.011
Cite this article as: Yang Y, Rui QY, Chen X, et al. Alterations in amplitude of low frequency fluctuation and regional homogeneity in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder and cognitive impairment: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study[J]. Chin J Magn Reson Imaging, 2022, 13(4): 62-68.DOI:10.12015/issn.1674-8034.2022.04.011

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