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Principle of amide proton transfer imaging and its research progress in glioma
LIU Xiaoyan  WANG Baojian  ZHANG Juan  NI Lin  MA Qianli  XIE Yuanzhong  LI Xiujuan 

Cite this article as: Liu XY, Wang BJ, Zhang J, et al. Principle of amide proton transfer imaging and its research progress in glioma[J]. Chin J Magn Reson Imaging, 2022, 13(2): 127-129. DOI:10.12015/issn.1674-8034.2022.02.031.


[Abstract] Glioma is the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system, high mortality and postoperative recurrence rate. At present, conventional magnetic resonance imaging technology can not meet the needs of clinical diagnosis and treatment decision-making. Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging can reflect the protein content and pH changes in cells at the molecular level by detecting the exchange rate of amide protons in free proteins and polypeptide chains in vivo with hydrogen protons in water, which can make up for the shortcomings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging technology. In recent years, APT imaging technology has been gradually applied in central nervous system diseases, especially in the early diagnosis, preoperative grading and curative effect evaluation of glioma. This paper mainly expounds the basic principle of APT imaging technology and its research progress in glioma.
[Keywords] glioma;amide proton transfer;chemical exchange saturation transfer;magnetic resonance imaging

LIU Xiaoyan1, 2   WANG Baojian1   ZHANG Juan3   NI Lin2   MA Qianli2   XIE Yuanzhong2   LI Xiujuan2*  

1 Shandong First Medical University (Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences), Tai'an 217000

2 Medical Imaging Center of Tai'an Central Hospital, Tai'an 217000

3 Department of Radiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Shandong First Medical University, Tai'an 217000

Li XJ, E-mail: myfly2006@126.com

Conflicts of interest   None.

Received  2021-11-26
Accepted  2022-01-24
DOI: 10.12015/issn.1674-8034.2022.02.031
Cite this article as: Liu XY, Wang BJ, Zhang J, et al. Principle of amide proton transfer imaging and its research progress in glioma[J]. Chin J Magn Reson Imaging, 2022, 13(2): 127-129.DOI:10.12015/issn.1674-8034.2022.02.031

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